Franklin considering options to remove 147 dead trees

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FRANKLIN, Ind. (AP) - The city of Franklin is trying to decide how it can cover the hefty cost of removing nearly 150 trees killed by an invasive beetle.

Over the next few months, 147 trees need to be removed from Province Park and Greenlawn Cemetery, Franklin Parks and Recreation Director Chip Orner told the (Franklin) Daily Journal (http://bit.ly/22UgZmU ). About 90 percent of those trees were killed by the emerald ash borer, an insect that digs into and lives inside ash trees, he said.

The emerald ash borer isn’t native to North America, so the beetles don’t have natural predators in Indiana, according to Purdue Extension agriculture and natural resource educator Sarah Hanson. The bug’s presence in North America was first recorded around 2002, and the species has become a bigger problem for ash trees in Indiana and other states in recent years, she said.

City Council members suggested that all 147 trees be taken down at the same time.

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Franklin, Indiana, United States39.48°N 86.06°W0.658Yes
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Franklin considering options to remove 147 dead trees
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FRANKLIN, Ind. (AP) - The city of Franklin is trying to decide how it can cover the hefty cost of removing nearly 150 trees killed by an invasive beetle.

Over the next few months, 147 trees need to be removed from Province Park and Greenlawn Cemetery, Franklin Parks and Recreation Director Chip Orner told the (Franklin) Daily Journal (http://bit.ly/22UgZmU ). About 90 percent of those trees were killed by the emerald ash borer, an insect that digs into and lives inside ash trees, he said.

The emerald ash borer isn’t native to North America, so the beetles don’t have natural predators in Indiana, according to Purdue Extension agriculture and natural resource educator Sarah Hanson. The bug’s presence in North America was first recorded around 2002, and the species has become a bigger problem for ash trees in Indiana and other states in recent years, she said.

City Council members suggested that all 147 trees be taken down at the same time.

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Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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