Emerald Ash Borer wreaking havoc across Livingston County

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MATT LEADER MATT@LIVINGSTONNEWS.COM
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The Emerald Ash Borer is continuing to make its presence known in Livingston County.

The town of Geneseo recently decided to fell about 65 Ash trees in Long Point Park in an attempt to prevent the spread of the invasive insect, which is expensive to control and usually kills Ashes within a two- to four-year period.

The village of Avon is currently in the midst of much larger felling operation covering 35 acres in its Driving Park.

“80 percent of the acreage is Ash trees,” said Village Mayor Tom Freeman. “We consulted with a forester from the Department of Environmental Conservation and a couple of private logging firms and determined that the best path forward was to get as much of the lumber before they were virtually guaranteed to have been killed by the borer.”

Freeman said the village is planning on selling the wood, which he hopes will cover the cost of felling the trees and planting new ones.

“I would say it’s probably in the $15,000 to $20,000 range in terms of lumber value,” said Freeman. “If we can come out of this net zero, we’ll be pleased.”

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Genseo, New York, United States42.8°N 77.82°W0.117Yes
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Emerald Ash Borer wreaking havoc across Livingston County
Original text (summary): 

The Emerald Ash Borer is continuing to make its presence known in Livingston County.

The town of Geneseo recently decided to fell about 65 Ash trees in Long Point Park in an attempt to prevent the spread of the invasive insect, which is expensive to control and usually kills Ashes within a two- to four-year period.

The village of Avon is currently in the midst of much larger felling operation covering 35 acres in its Driving Park.

“80 percent of the acreage is Ash trees,” said Village Mayor Tom Freeman. “We consulted with a forester from the Department of Environmental Conservation and a couple of private logging firms and determined that the best path forward was to get as much of the lumber before they were virtually guaranteed to have been killed by the borer.”

Freeman said the village is planning on selling the wood, which he hopes will cover the cost of felling the trees and planting new ones.

“I would say it’s probably in the $15,000 to $20,000 range in terms of lumber value,” said Freeman. “If we can come out of this net zero, we’ll be pleased.”

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Emerald ash borer in the USA 2015-16ongoing2016-02-26
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